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» Behind the songs: heart of worship | Proclaim Blog

Behind the songs: heart of worship

Behind the songs: heart of worship
Almost everyone knows the words to Matt Redman’s iconic song “Heart of Worship.

 When the music fades, 

and all is stripped away

And I simply come

Longing just to bring

Something that’s of worth

That will bless your heart . . .

 

 I’m coming back to the Heart of Worship, 

and it’s all about You, Jesus.

 

 But have you heard about how that song came to be? It’s a great story.

The senior pastor at Redman’s home church in Watford, England, believed that the congregation had lost its way, even though the church, with its innovative weekend services and elaborate worship arts production, had become a pace setter for many throughout Europe. He sensed that many in the church had become spectators rather than participants in the journey of faith, so he did a bold thing. He decided to eliminate the sound system, all musical accompaniment, and multimedia. He announced to the church that they would be going through a season of simplicity in which they would use nothing but the unamplifed human voice during their weekend services.

Can you imagine? No microphones. No guitars. Not even a keyboard.

In various interviews, Redman has recounted that the weeks following his pastor’s unconventional decision were filled with plenty of awkward silences. Attendance declined steadily, but the staff did not flinch. They were committed to a church-wide rediscovery of true worship. Eventually, unaccompanied prayers became transparent, beautiful in their honesty, and undecorated music became more heartfelt than ever. Gradually the sound system, multimedia, and instrumentation were reintroduced, but the fast made a lasting impression on Redman and many others in the church.

Redman wrote Heart of Worship to express the changes God made in his own heart during this unusual season. At first he had no plans to share it, but he did so at his pastor’s urging.

It has been said that elegance is having everything that you need and nothing more. (Click to tweet) Actually, we talk about that quite a bit here at Logos. We work hard to fill Proclaim, and all our products, with features that are a genuine asset to you.

We want the worship of God’s people to be unhindered, and Proclaim is just a tool to help you make that possible.

Comments

  1. Don Trest says:

    "He sensed that many in the church had become spectators rather than participants in the journey of faith, so he did a bold thing. He decided to eliminate the sound system, all musical accompaniment, and multimedia. He announced to the church that they would be going through a season of simplicity in which they would use nothing but the unamplifed human voice during their weekend services.

    Can you imagine? No microphones. No guitars. Not even a keyboard…."

  2. Jeff Henson says:

    I wonder why we feel we need instruments to worship. The church worshiped without instruments for centuries. Introduction of musical instruments is a recent phenomenon. I am happy that our congregation still sings acappella. The singing is beautiful, heartfelt and we can actually hear and edify each other! I don't have a problem with musical instruments, but when I have worshiped in churches that use them they are far too loud. We can't even hear our own voices much less voice of the brother or sister next to us.

    • Ray Deck III says:

      Thanks for your comment, Jeff. It’s interesting to me how expectations change over time. Would you believe that loud music makes me feel safe? I don’t have to be self conscious about my voice when the music is loud enough that nobody can hear me. When the lights are black and the music is loud, it becomes much easier for me to connect with God. I think it might be a generational thing. What do you think?

    • Ray Deck III says:

      Thanks for your comment, Jeff. Believe it or not, I feel more comfortable when the music is loud enough that I can't hear myself. I like LOUD music, so I don't have to worry that my pitch is making anyone else's ears bleed.

      I'm working on a post about that, actually.

  3. When we meet at our congregations today, can we seek to make worship all about God?

  4. What a Wonderful song! And it is all about worshiping JESUS!

  5. What a Wonderful song! And it is all about worshiping JESUS!

  6. What a Wonderful song! And it is all about worshiping JESUS!

  7. love it

  8. God bless! Redman

  9. Gavin Jones says:

    Jeff, your question is excellent. God sanctioned and approved one instrument only for worship – our hearts (Eph. 5:19). Why do some insert what pleases us and try to improve on what God has commanded for worship? I love your comment that your group sings and EVERYONE can participate. Just like God commanded ;) For your further study…http://www.churches-of-christ.net/tracts/job117u.htm

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